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was the building. we were in a building that had long outlived its usefulness as a place for residents to live. it was no longer consistent with any medicare or medicaid rules. we were the only facility left in the country running open wards. we were told we would not be allowed any longer by both the federal and state authorities. it was a place where, while the care was wonderful, the building did not fit any modern earthquake standards. where privacy was insufficient to support human dignity. where people did not have a place to store their stuff. where people did not have a window to look out on. where we had to have wards that had closing doors because there was not that easy access to the outside. here we had a vibrant set of people -- residents, nurses, doctors, attendants -- but what we lacked was a space that was equal to them. with that, i hope all of you -- looking around the crowd, so many of you did to make this reality. derek parker set the vision of every room with a window. whether it is one of you who voted for this, or one of our wonderful residents who has been a volunteer h
want to take that moment and reflect on his contribution. let us also take a moment to reflect on the doctor. we are blessed. you do not want to be the best of the best. you want to be only the one who does what you do. his commitment to public health in san francisco is second to none. he has done an extraordinary job leading by example. this is a city that is doing things that no other city in the united states of america could even imagine doing, things that even when we had all the resources in the world and all the capacity, things that cities could not do. this commitment to an acute care, facility, a skilled nursing facility -- what county is having a ribbon cutting on a new nursing facility in this modern age? and what city and county can lay claim to comprehensive universal health care, regardless of pre- existing conditions, regardless of your ability to pay? dr. mitch kastz has been the architect of all of this. thank you for your leadership. there is the old play towline that if there is any hope for the future of those with lanterns will pass them on to others. let
with people from their home country but we as much want to use the internet as a tool for people to connect within the local san francisco community. >> i think it's our job as public educators to give them this access and give them this opportunity to see that their efforts are being appreciated beyond their immediate reach. >> you have to blend this idea of community network with computer equipment with training and with support. we can pull all that together, then we've got it. >> it's as much about social and economic justice -- in fact it's more about social and economic justice than just >> i work with the department of environment and we are recycling oil. thank you. we can go into a refinery and we can use it again. they do oil changes and sell it anyway, so now they know when a ticket to a. hal>> to you have something you want to get rid of? >> why throw it away when you can reuse it? >> it can be filtered out and used for other products. >> [speaking spanish] >> it is going to be a good thing for us to take used motor oil from customers. we have a 75-gallon tank that we used and w
been working with a developer on a proposal, financial proposal, used proposal, which would essentially be wrapped up into a term sheet. that would simply describe the basic elements of a project, economic parameters, fundamental terms, basis for negotiating, transaction documents for the company would follow, if the project moves forward as proposed. the project will continue to change through the public review process. this is really just the basic outline. the project -- some of the other reviews that will occur may also change the project because in needs to be analyzed under the environmental review. any mitigation measures, alternatives proposed, will also be analyzed as to their environmental consequences. also, the project will undergo public review during other heightened bulk issues changing in this project. those considerations will come either before the planning commission or board of supervisors, after an environmental review. projects very often change as we go through these processes. that is number 1, what the term sheet is. also, to talk about where we are in the proce
the conservation of the water is an energy used in this building, and enhance the co2 emission reductions of this building. mayor, thank you for walking the walk as well as talking the talk. it is something to be proud of, leed-certified. to all the care givers and all the volunteers who make up the family of residents, to express our appreciation for your long hours and for your selfless service, and know that the battles that senator yee and assembly men andiano and i are putting in sacramento right now -- if we let governor have his -- if we let the governor have his way to eliminate government support services and to eliminate government general fund support for health services, people who are now able to be in this community would no longer be able to. we would need over 10 laguna honda's. we are not going to let arnold schwarzenegger have his way so that people can have the option of dignity. thank you all for joining us today. [applause] >> san francisco has a great elected city family. i want to acknowledge the president of the board of supervisors, president david chu, supervisor
connors. thank you and john predecessor stole away from us, michael lane. thank you, michael, wherever you are. lastly, my personal reflection on this building. this building, to me, is truly a monument to the tremendous capacity of generosity in the heart of sentences go. the voters of san francisco in their great willingness to support this facility will always have this hospital as a sign of their willingness to help those most in need. these neighborhoods that surround this facility, i think, consider laguna honda at their private treasure. we really do look at this hospital as our own. we love this hospital. we have great care and great love for the residents of this hospital. on behalf of the neighboring residents, to all of the current residents of the hospital, this is for you. we are thrilled we were able to do this for you. thank you, everyone. [applause] >> the work of the health department would never be possible without its commission. the commission is the governing body. you have been around to this project long enough to see some fantastic commissioners who have also gone o
[applause] >> hang you, mayor newsom, and thank you for helping us achieve our 77% landfill that version rate -- thank you, mayor newsom. we need to focus our attention on achieving 0 waste by 2020. to meet our goal, we will need the continued participation of all san franciscans in the mandatory composting and recycling program, making sure that everything possible goes into the blue and green bins, and as little as possible goes into the black. as the mayor pointed out, we sent the smallest amount of material to landfills since we have been keeping records. less than 15% the year before. we are right on track, and if we keep up achieve 0 well in san francisco well before 2020. .9 waste in san francisco well before 2020. we already accomplished this lovely to a degree with bans on hard to recycle products like plastic bagszek]Ñisr and a the. there are actions globally, but change does need to happen at the state and federal level, and that is why san francisco has been supporting extended producer responsibility legislation in sacramento and washington. taxpayers and loca
that used to go in the waste water treatment plant won't, it will go back in the ground water and recharge and can be used for other things. you do that across the city and you could change the way we treat storm water. the amount of money we spent on pumping the water, all that changes. in the waste water improvement this swail, the basin, you could see the storm water runs down the street, it moves over >> there are other government departments we work with. i want to acknowledge doug johnson, the transportation authority under the direction of jose luis. and caltrans, jimmy pan may and hinge cunge. and then the better streets plans guru. and al hearst and lauren worked on it. we worked closely with the h.t.a. on these projects. i see amy here from the office of economic development. a lot of different folks worked together to -- to make these projects happen i want to make sure to acknowledge them. one that i haven't yet mentioned, though it has been referenced, has to do with public art. public works is -- is you know, typically a profession of civil engineers and hard tough stuff, pip
that in mind. >> commissioner clyde? commissioner clyde: i'm wondering if you're in a special use district of any kind or redevelopment area of any kind? >> i don't believe we developed there anymore. >> because the thing that comes up for me commissioners, is -- is the underserved nature of the location. the fact that it doesn't have grocery stores convenient grocery stores, that it does not have convenient. i -- i mean -- >> can i make a correction to that. it does. saveway is right in the area. >> three blocks. >> three blocks away. >> because -- for me public transportation, i mean i can just imagine what it is for an elder person relying on public transportation to take them back and for the across town and something that is within walking distance. >> that will be different, though, once the legislation is enacted in terms of -- of access to -- to a -- you know a pharmaceutical because -- if this legislation is enacted then saferway will no longer be able to sell pharmaceuticals. it would be back to a --, a walgreen's or a -- or a independent drugstore. >> okay, thank you. >> what ab
bay area, california, and washington, d.c., who worked with us to make this happen. many are here today and others in spirit. thank you all. we made it. the grand central station of the west coast is starting construction. [applause] thank you. now, i would like to introduce our first speaker, the chairman of our board, nathaniel ford. he serves as the chair of the transbay joint powers authority and the executive director of the municipal transportation agency. he also sits on the caltrain board of directors. he has been a strong supporter of the project since its arrival, and we are deeply grateful for his leadership and guidance. chairman ford. [applause] >> thank you, maria. good morning, everyone. today is a great day, and we thank you for coming to our ceremony. i say our ceremony because it took all of us to pull this together, all of our hard work. those of you who contributed over the decade, a long effort to end at today culminating in a groundbreaking for our new transit center. there are many people that we should mention today and give a little bit of perspective in t
diplomatic relations between the u.s. and japan. we had the privilege of being there is a couple of years back to celebrate the 50th anniversary. if you walk into the international room, you will see that the mayor from a sock and had not been enlarged robot celebrating the 50th anniversary. since then, 17 others have been established. this is number 18. we recently celebrated some significant milestones. 38th anniversary of our shanghai sister city. that was a significant moment, in terms of the relationship, again not just our two cities, but both countries. the first formal relations between the two countries were formed through that sister city bond. we had the opportunity to go to !bed alarm as our first trip bak there. we established a sister region between bangalore and the san francisco area. there was a delegation of leaders who went back there. obviously connected to china and asia. we felt like it needed to incorporate india. that brings us here, this 18th finding of a sister city that celebrates the contribution and connection between spain and the that it states, between the
to follow us and talk to them as we bring them to the hall and lead them to the first station. you find they are humbling on both sides. humbling for me. it's a great opportunity to give the folks the respect they deserve and don't get enough of. >> these are the people we step over on the way to our jobs. i was thankful to the mayor. our jobs are about helping people. this is another way for us to give back to our community that treats us very well. i like the way they take you around to get you started. that's nice. they let you go and thoser the different things you need. >> are you with a program, now? >> i was a long time -- >> you want a job search? >> career planning [inaudible]. you are interested in getting into the trades? and that is where they will double check your trading skills you got and put you on a crew and you can do construction work or any kind of construction. >> okay. >> good. are you receiving food stamps? >> no. >> not medical or nothing. >> no. >> we got to get you hooked up. >> this the department of human searchss this is the benefit's section mu
ways. mike. [applause] -- zero ways. mike. >> thank you, and thank you, mayor newsom, for using our site for this announcement. we are pleased to be the city's partner in helping achieve the goals that the city sets forth. some of them have been rather exciting to try to accomplish, but it has been found, and we are going to ensure that this city isw6r;[ñhr the first to ace zero ways, and we are going to do it before 2020. there are a lot of exciting things going on, and we believe it is doable, and we are committed to making sure it happens. in the process, it has been pleasing for us to be able to put people to work doing a very necessary function. i want to introduce mimi chan, who came to us through the jobs now program and has been able to get to work doing something that we did not have the money to do before the programf5b gave us te work -- the money to do the work. >> i love this company. when i first started, i was really excited because i was working for a green company. when i leave, just about work. i bring my work home. i teach my kids about recycling, composting, and
for every conceivable walk of life. and i truly believe that people look to us to see that it is possible to live together through all of these differences. they know that there is something special and magical about this city and this region. and that is why we are here. that is why i am here. and i am grateful that you are here. i am grateful for the extraordinary contribution of the people from mexico and central america. i think that this is interesting and appropriate to notice that san francisco county has the distinction as it relates to the latino community that is unique among the 58 counties. we have more latino representatives. -- >> this is not the case with the other counties. we have these in el salvador and nicaragua, as well as mexico. not everybody understands this and we are celebrating this remarkable collection. the city of san francisco took the lead as the city of refuge after the civil wars in the 1980's. we established, firmly, the foundation that marks so much of what makes this city a special place. it is mocked by those who do not understand and who did not want
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14